Financial Dimension – Dynamics AX 2012 Great Enhancement

i hope it will assist you

Amir's Microsoft Dynamics AX space

How to Add a New Financial Dimension in AX 2012

Financial dimensions ia the great featue with lots of enhancement in Dynamics ax 2012, Now AX 2012 supports an unlimited number of financial dimension, and their setup and maintenance has been greatly simplified. This feature is real useful when we trying to see reports on Financial Dimensions. I will explain this blog by creating the new Financial dimenion “Grant” which is also the new feature in AX 2012.

First create the new code. Go to General Ledger > Setup > Financial dimensions > Financial dimensions and create a new financial dimension. After that there you’ll notice that the ‘Use values from’ can be set to <Custom dimension> as above, but also there is a long list existing dimensions as well.

If you use an existing field, then you won’t have to create any values for your new financial dimension –…

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I want You to think Positively, No situation is bigger than your mind

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POSITIVE THINKING MIND

And Jesus answered them, “Have faith in God. Truly, I say to you, whoever says to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and thrown into the sea,’ and does not doubt in his heart, but believes that what he says will come to pass, it will be done for him. Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. And whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone, so that your Father also who is in heaven may forgive you your trespasses.” Mark 11:22-25

Is your mind half full or half empty?  Your answer to this question reflects the outlook of your life; your attitude towards yourself; whether you are optimistic or pessimistic –and it may even affect your health.  The positive thinking that accompanies optimism is a key part of stress management; an effective stress management is associated with many health benefits. The good news is positive thinking can be learnt!

Positive thinking doesn’t mean that you keep your head in the sand and ignore life’s less pleasant situations. Positive thinking just means that you approach the unpleasantness in a more positive and productive way. You think the best is going to happen, not the worst. Positive thinking often starts with self-talk. Self-talk is the endless stream of unspoken thoughts that run through your head every day. These automatic thoughts can be positive or negative. Some of your self-talk comes from logic and reason. Other self-talk may arise from misconceptions that you create because of lack of information.

If the thoughts that run through your head are mostly negative, your outlook on life is more likely pessimistic. If your thoughts are mostly positive, you’re likely an optimist — someone who practices positive thinking.

Researchers continue to explore the effects of positive thinking and optimism on health. Health benefits that positive thinking may provide include:

 

·         Long life

·         Lower rates of depression

·         Lower levels of distress

·         Greater resistance to the common cold- boosted  body immunity

·         Better psychological and physical well-being

·         Reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease

·         Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

It’s unclear why people who engage in positive thinking experience these health benefits. One theory is that having a positive outlook enables you to cope better with stressful situations, which reduces the harmful health effects of stress on your body. It’s also thought that positive and optimistic people tend to live healthier lifestyles — they get more physical activity, follow a healthier diet, and don’t smoke or drink alcohol in excess.

 

Not sure if your self-talk is positive or negative? Here are some common forms of negative self-talk:

 

Ø  Filtering. You magnify the negative aspects of a situation and filter out all of the positive ones. For example, say you had a great day at work. You completed your tasks ahead of time and were complimented for doing a speedy and thorough job. But you forgot one minor step. That evening, you focus only on your oversight and forget about the compliments you received.

Ø  Personalizing. When something bad occurs, you automatically blame yourself. For example, you hear that an evening out with friends is canceled, and you assume that the change in plans is because no one wanted to be around you.

Ø  Catastrophizing. You automatically anticipate the worst. The drive-through coffee shop gets your order wrong and you automatically think that the rest of your day will be a disaster.

Ø  Polarizing. You see things only as good or bad, black or white. There is no middle ground. You feel that you have to be perfect or that you’re a total failure.

 

Focusing on positive thinking

You can learn to turn negative thinking into positive thinking. The process is simple, but it does take time and practice — you’re creating a new habit, after all. Here are some ways to think and behave in a more positive and optimistic way:

o   Identify areas to change. If you want to become more optimistic and engage in more positive thinking, first identify areas of your life that you typically think negatively about, whether it’s work, your daily commute or a relationship, for example. You can start small by focusing on one area to approach in a more positive way.

o   Check yourself. Periodically during the day, stop and evaluate what you’re thinking. If you find that your thoughts are mainly negative, try to find a way to put a positive spin on them.

o   Be open to humor. Give yourself permission to smile or laugh, especially during difficult times. Seek humor in everyday happenings. When you can laugh at life, you feel less stressed.

o   Follow a healthy lifestyle. Exercise at least three times a week to positively affect mood and reduce stress. Follow a healthy diet to fuel your mind and body. And learn to manage stress.

o   Surround yourself with positive people. Make sure those in your life are positive, supportive people you can depend on to give helpful advice and feedback. Negative people may increase your stress level and make you doubt your ability to manage stress in healthy ways.

o   Practice positive self-talk. Start by following one simple rule: Don’t say anything to yourself that you wouldn’t say to anyone else. Be gentle and encouraging with yourself. If a negative thought enters your mind, evaluate it rationally and respond with affirmations of what is good about you.

If you tend to have a negative outlook, don’t expect to become an optimist overnight. But with practice, eventually your self-talk will contain less self-criticism and more self-acceptance. You may also become less critical of the world around you. Plus, when you share your positive mood and positive experience, both you and those around you enjoy an emotional boost.

Practicing positive self-talk will improve your outlook. When your state of mind is generally optimistic, you’re able to handle everyday stress in a more constructive way. That ability may contribute to the widely observed health benefits of positive thinking.

Make a commitment to yourself to think in positive ways and make a commitment not to think in negative way. Always fill your mind with positive things. Don’t pollute your precious mind with something useless.

“A positive mind anticipates happiness, joy, health, and favorable results.”

Have a an inspired week folks!

Always give your best

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Mediocrity yields stress, frustration & regrets

By Pastor M.

The old prof had given the assignment two days before and was collecting the papers. As he turned his in, John thanked his lucky stars that he was one of those academically gifted students who didn’t have to work hard to get an acceptable grade. The next day when he got his paper back, however, he saw that his had been marked in red ink, ‘is this the best you can do?’ Knowing he had been busted, John quickly redid the paper and handed it in again.

At the next class, the prof. once more returned his work with the same comment at the bottom. This went on three more times until in frustration, John finally took his paper to the prof’s office and said to her, ‘I can’t do any better than this!’ At this the prof replied, ‘fine, now I can read it!’

SUCCESS ORIENTATION

I love that little story because it brings out the difference between two different orientations. A ‘success orientation’ is when we focus on merely being better than others, while an ‘excellence orientation’ is when we focus on being the best we can possibly be. A success orientation means you’re constantly measuring your work by what others are doing. It inevitably results in mediocrity!

The mediocre employee always arrives late to work, blaming the weather or traffic or some other bad luck. Once at the office, he takes a long time to settle down to work. He’s among the first to go for tea break and lunch, and among the last to get back to his desk. Even when he’s actually at his desk, he’s usually chatting on his phone or with fellow employees.
He does just enough to keep him from getting fired! He then wonders why he’s never promoted or why he never gets a better bonus at the end of the year. He invents a conspiracy theory that he is being backstabbed by his colleagues whom he claims are jealous of his success! Paradoxically, even though choosing mediocrity is easier, it doesn’t make us happier. It often results in stress, frustration and regret at unrealized potential.

WORK FOR GOD

The good book says ‘whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for God and not people’. That means that if you are a road sweeper, you sweep the floor as if you are Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel, or Beethoven composing music, or Rudisha running 800 metres. You sweep the road so well that all the angels in heaven will stop for a moment and admire your work saying, “Wow, there goes an excellent sweeper!”
In his book, Excellence, John Gardner says, ‘Some people have greatness thrust upon them. Very few have excellence thrust upon them. They achieve it. They do not achieve it unwittingly by ‘doing what comes naturally’ and they don’t stumble into it in the course of amusing themselves. All excellence involves discipline and tenacity of purpose.’
This week, why not make a choice to be known at work as a person of excellence?

Bibliography

M., P. (2013). Mediocrity . Standard Newspaper, September 2013.